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IDAHO CORONAVIRUS INFORMATION

Idaho Department of Health & Welfare



Statewide Stay-Home Order in Effect

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BOISE, Idaho — Idaho Gov. Brad Little knows his “stay at home” order is impacting everyone’s daily lives. But he says he issued it because he believes it will save lives and keep our health care system from being overwhelmed with sick patients.

“You cannot stop coronavirus here or probably anywhere in the world given what’s taken place,” the governor said during the taping of this Sunday’s Viewpoint. “So now it’s how do you manage it.”

Little decided the best way to manage it was to tell Idahoans to stay home as much as possible to slow the spread.

His “stay-at-home” order allows those in jobs deemed “essential”, such as health care, public safety, grocery store and gas station workers to stay on the job. It’s also okay for Idahoans to go out to get essential needs like groceries and prescriptions. Otherwise, hunker down at home.

“My job is to protect the safety of all Idahoans, and this is my job right now,” Little said.

RELATED: Idaho governor issues statewide stay-at-home order, signs ‘extreme emergency declaration’

The governor says his main concern is health care capacity. Not only having enough hospital beds, but also personal protective equipment, such as medical masks, for health care workers.

So, is Idaho’s health care system prepared for a spike in the number of patients?

“Well, they are as prepared as they can be,” Little said. “We have a lot of people in Idaho, and we don’t have a lot of capacity, particularly in rural Idaho. We’re really no different than most other places. The supply is not adequate.”

Little issued a proclamation recently that would make it easier for retired doctors and nurses to come back into the profession to help with the coronavirus situation. He says some retirees have expressed interest, but not as many as he would like.


Click on the links below for more information:

Stay-at-Home Order (PDF)

Idaho Resources


Governor Brad Little gives the latest on coronavirus in Idaho.


Idaho Governor Brad Little waiving 1 week waiting period for unemployment insurance claims.

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A statewide stay-home order is now in effect in Idaho.

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Idaho Governor Brad Little to give update on coronavirus, COVID-19.

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Governor’s Updates


See if our FAQ answers your questions. If not, call 2-1-1 or your local public health district with questions.


Latest Updates

See if our FAQ answers your questions. If not, please call the Idaho COVID-19 Hotline at 1-888-330-3010.

Idaho public health officials are monitoring the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) situation very closely. Idaho is currently reporting 891 cases.

Officials are working with CDC and other states and are also in regular communication with Idaho public health districts and healthcare providers around the state.


COVID-19 in Idaho

*Data updated at 5:00 p.m. MT, 4/02/2020. State-level data will be updated at 5 p.m. MT daily, based on surveillance system records provided by the health districts. Public health district data will be updated on their agency website at their discretion and may differ from data presented here. Data are preliminary and subject to change.

(Click for more details)


Everyone should take precautions to avoid all respiratory diseases, including staying home if you’re sick, avoiding sick people, and covering your coughs and sneezes with the crook of your elbow or a tissue.


Local News

Governor Little: Risk for coronavirus low in Idaho

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RESOURCE LINKS

Click on the links below for information:

STATE

Schools

Providers

Long Term Care

Governor’s Work Group

Contact Us

NATIONAL

Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

World Health Organization (WHO)

Central District Health Idaho (CDHI)



Frequently Asked Questions

What is the most important thing for Idahoans to do at this time?

Updated March 17, 2020

  • Be aware of the rapidly changing nature of the pandemic and do your part to stay current on the latest recommendations from public health officials. Frequently check this website as well as the websites for the local public health districts for the latest Idaho-specific information and follow the recommendations of local officials to the best of your ability.

  • Help stop the spread of germs by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face when out in public, trying to keep a distance of at least 6 feet from people who appear to have respiratory illness, covering your cough or sneeze if you are sick, and staying home when you are sick.

  • Be aware that there are other, common human coronaviruses that cause respiratory disease. These are not the same virus that causes COVID-19.

  • Follow public health travel recommendations to avoid unnecessary risk; these are available on the CDC web site here.

  • It is currently flu and respiratory disease season; we recommend getting a flu vaccine to stay as healthy as possible.

  • If you or someone you know may have been exposed to the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, call your medical provider to determine next steps.


Should I get tested for the novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?

It is still cold and flu season, and you do not need to seek medical attention for a mild respiratory illness such as a cold. However, if you have had close contact with a person with known novel coronavirus or have recently traveled to an area with ongoing spread and you develop fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider and ask for instructions about how to seek care.

At this time, the CDC doesn’t recommend testing of people who do not have symptoms. Because of the limited number of tests, there is a need to preserve them for the sickest and those with the highest risk of infection.


What is the process for testing novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Testing for the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is being done on a patient-by-patient basis. Epidemiologists at the state and at local public health districts are in consultation with healthcare providers and will facilitate testing at the state lab for high-risk patients. Since influenza is still widely circulating and has similar symptoms, rapid flu tests will generally be recommended to rule out flu before proceeding with coronavirus testing.

The state lab is receiving samples Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. until further notice, so tests can be run as quickly and efficiently as possible.

In addition, four large commercial labs (LabCorp, Quest Diagnostics, ARUP, and UW Medicine) are also accepting Idaho samples for testing. There may be a cost associated with this testing. Labs will report their results to the state, and those numbers will be posted on this website each day. It is normal for test results to take 2-5 days to be delivered to the healthcare provider who ordered the testing.


What are the symptoms of novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?

How long do they take to appear after exposure?

Experts believe symptoms of COVID-19 can include fever, cough, and shortness of breath and may appear 2-14 days after exposure.


What is the likelihood that I, or someone in my family, could be exposed to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?

The immediate risk is low at this time. It’s important to remember that most people (currently thought to be about 80 percent) infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 will have mild illness. A much smaller group of people – mostly those who are older and are medically fragile or have underlying health conditions — may have more severe illness.


When will a vaccine be available?

This will be a brand-new vaccine. Currently, federal health officials estimate that it will be about a year before a vaccine is available.


Can my dog or cat become sick with COVID-19?

The CDC has not received any reports about pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19. Nevertheless, it is recommended that people who are sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known. If no one else can care for your pet while you are sick, you should wash your hands before and after you interact with your animal and wear a face mask. For more information click here.


What is Idaho doing to monitor the coronavirus risk?

Idaho Public Health officials are monitoring the rapidly changing novel coronavirus situation very closely, domestically and internationally. We are working with the Governor’s Office and other state agencies including the Idaho Office of Emergency Management, local public health districts, and healthcare providers around the state, as well as CDC and other states and are working to contain the spread of COVID-19.

Additionally, Gov. Brad Little has launched a new Coronavirus Working Group dedicated to supporting Idaho’s public health agencies and increasing coordination and communication around the multiple aspects of the planning and response effort.

This website is the best source for Idaho-specific information about the novel coronavirus response.

If you have additional questions, please visit the Contact Us page of this website.


MORE RESOURCES

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

  • CDC Coronavirus Disease 2019 web site

     – Includes information about the disease, situation updates, and information for specific audiences such as travelers, communities, schools, and businesses and others.

Idaho Resources


CONTACT US

IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & WELFARE

450 W State St
Boise, Idaho 83720


Public Health Districts

District 1 – Panhandle Health District 
http://panhandlehealthdistrict.org/
877-415-5225 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday

District 2 – North Central Health District
http://idahopublichealth.com/
208-748-0400 or 1-866-736-6632 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays

District 3 – Southwest District Health
https://phd3.idaho.gov
208-455-5411 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays

District 4 – Central District Health
https://cdhd.idaho.gov/
208-321-2222 Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays

District 5 – South Central Public Health
https://phd5.idaho.gov/
208-737-1138 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays

District 6 – Southeastern Idaho Public Health
https://siphidaho.org/
208-234-5875 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays

District 7 – East Idaho Public Health
https://eiph.idaho.gov
208-522-0310 or 855-533-3160 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays

News Media Inquiries

Contact local health district
-or-
Idaho Department of Health & Welfare

Ph: 208-334-0668

Related Business Information

Idaho Coronavirus Information

450 West State Street, Boise, ID, USA

1 (208) 321-2222

Website: https://coronavirus.idaho.gov

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